Mid-season transition for cyclists

Whether you race often or not, taking a break mid-season and changing gears is always a wise decision. That is of course if you are not preparing for a peak race in the middle of July or early August, and even if so, taking a transition after that peak race will still be a wise move. For cyclists targeting races in May and June, intensity and greater weekly volume needs to be part of the game plan starting in March, leading to four or five solid months of working hard to make fitness and strength gains. At some point, giving your body and mind a complete break will help you advance; otherwise staleness, plateaus, and burnout can happen easily. The following are a few tips to help you structure a mid-season transition, to get you back on the path to making gains through the end of the season. Continue reading

Missing training – Adjusting the plan

Whether you train with a coach, on your own, or use a pre-written program, you are going to need to adjust your training program at times. General fatigue, lack of time, and life in general will always play a role in preventing training and missing training days. So what do you do? The good news is a few days missed will not affect training at all. It will throw you off a little both physically and mentally but there are ways to adjust.

Training in AZ Continue reading

Stomach Issues while racing – Possible causes and solutions

If you have ever dealt with a stomach issue while racing, then you have experienced the gut wrenching, painful, disappointing feeling it brings. Once you are dealing with a stomach issue, there is little you can do and no quick solution. Slowing down to allow digestion to take place is one solution but to stop racing may be the only answer if the pain is severe. The best way to avoid stomach issues, otherwise known as the dreaded gut rot, is to prevent it. In this article we will discuss a few aspects of racing that can lead to stomach issues.

Poor pacing can easily lead to stomach issues, especially when you are competing in long duration events. The longer the event, the more need for food and water and the more important pacing becomes, especially for events that last from 7-10 hours. Too many intense surges during these longer events can easily lead to stomach issues. When you surge and work a higher intensity, even for a few minutes, you create an increased need for blood flow to the working muscles and to cool the body. That leaves less blood flow for digestion. Continue reading